Tools for analysis of 23andme genetic info 10


free NA Neanderthals Artist's_rendition_of_Earth_approximately_60,000_years_ago -commons.wikimedia.org

23andme reveals your “% Neanderthal”

What do your genes say about you!?

You can find out by running the 23andme test! And once you do, there are so many tools to help you analyze your genetic info and make the most of your results.

With my clients, I focus on the genetic info that describes your body’s ability to methylate (MTHFR) and detoxify. But there are so many other relevant topics, such as locating relatives/ancestors for family trees, mapping your genome, locating all the research on a particular gene and more!

Here are three tools to start with. They’ll provide general info, specific nutrition/supplementation insight and athletic profiling:

Please remember: Genes are not the be all end all when it comes to disease risk… the study of Epigenetics (as well as common sense) proves that your environment* acts upon your genetics and ultimately has the greatest impact on your health. You can feel empowered by that! *Environment = air, food, microbes, relationships, emotions.

  1. PureGenomics offers an analysis of a few key genes that affect methylation,  detox, mental health & cognition, weight management and nutrient metabolism.
    • Unfortunately, they don’t just give this info away– It is free, but someone deemed to be a “practitioner” needs to set up an account for you. I will happily get you access for a small fee to cover my time (fee = whatever you choose to give).  Please see below for how to get this done.
    • The site will provide you with 2 resources (please scroll to the bottom of this post for images of some samples): “Personalized Table,” which lists Pure Encapsulations supplements that might benefit you, and “Personalized Graph,” which indicate which part of various pathways may be affected by your unique genetic makeup. Find these at the top, under “My Results.”
    • The site also provides a list of which PureEncapsulations products their research deems best for each of your SNPs. Unfortunately, you can’t generate this report– it can only be done by the practitioner who created your account.
    • Here’s what to do if you would like me create a PureGenomics account for you:
      1. Send me a few crumbs (say 5 bucks?… whatever works for you). Send to Anne@BuzzNutrition.com via PayPal or Venmo.
      2. in the PayPal/Venmo interface, please mention PureGenomics and include your email address.
      3. I’ll create your account as soon as I can & email a confirmation.
      4. You’ll get an email from PureGenomics with instructions. You can either upload your 23andme data by providing your login info or uploading the raw data directly. (*To access your 23andme raw data, find instructions here.)
      5. Once you upload your 23andme data, I’ll be notified by the PureGenomics site. At that point, I’ll generate your supplement report and email it to you. I can only do this if you allow me to view your results. Please see disclaimer below.
      6. **Implicit in your request for the PureGenomics supplement recommendations is an understanding that I’ll be able to see your data. (If you allow it, I will only have access to the info produced by PureGenomics, which is a mere subset of your 23andme data). But I won’t look at it. I’ll just save the data as a PDF and email it to you. Be assured,  you can hide your data from me by going to Account –> My Account, then unchecking the box at the very top, next to “Allow my practitioner, Anne Buzzelli to view my results.”
    • If you want to order any of the products from the recommendation, here’s a way to get a discount! The BuzzNutrition Supplement Portal offers PureGenomics supplements at a really nice site-wide discount, as well as products from hundreds of other brands. Enter the access code “buzznut” at this link: BuzzNutrition Supplement Portal. (Transparency disclaimer: I will receive a small portion of purchases made through this portal. It’s a win-win!)
  2. Athletigen provides insight about your ideal forms of exercise. This includes things like endurance, muscle type and recovery time. *Please see the comment from Athletigen below for updated information.*

If you want to dig a little deeper, check these out:

  • **To access your 23andme raw data, find instructions here.
  • GeneticGenie provides you with both a Methylation Analysis and a Detox Profile. The former will indicate whether you need to tweak your diet and supplementation (especially to make sure you’re taking the correct forms of folate and B12). The latter will help you understand how well your body can detoxify (this output is much less helpful than the methylation analysis).
  • Promethease creates a report for $5. It’s a mess of data, but I don’t recommend it unless you’re planning to dig deep.
  • Livewello offers a comprehensive look at the relationship between your genetics and physical traits & disease risk (all for $19.95).
  • CodeGen.eu offers “tools to help you explore your individual 1600-3000 page report: modern search, over 2000 topics, major categories, filters, favorites, social genomics.” Includes “Psychological traits such as resilience, stress response, empathy, etc.”
  • NutraHacker has some free features: “After a short 29 question anonymous survey that contributes to research, receive a FREE detoxification and methylation analysis (examining 49 SNPs) that will help clarify your nutritional needs. You also receive a FREE placebo tendency analysis report.” Full report is $23 and includes all future updates.
  • Infino.me offers a good cause & some great visuals. It is “a citizen science experiment to help people lose weight, feel better, and live longer. By bringing together the right data we can understand the interactions between genetics and lifestyle for the good of science! Our tools give you an overview of the genetic risk profile of several diseases, and match you with open-access literature written about specific genetic variants.”
  • Enlis.com offers a free genome report, but to download it you have to hand over $40.
  • GeneKnot.com allows you to “find users with similar DNA and share the experience.”

Even MORE tools can be found at these links:

If you find anything cool (like a long-lost relative living down the hall in your apartment building) or another tool (that identifies alien DNA or designs specific fashion that best suits your genes), please let me know pronto!

 


The following are sample reports from the PureGenomics analysis mentioned above:

Personalized Report (this is just a snippet):Screen Shot 2017-09-12 at 2.35.39 PM

Personalized Diagrams (2 of many):

Screen Shot 2017-09-12 at 2.37.55 PMScreen Shot 2017-09-12 at 2.37.38 PM

 

 

 

 

 

Supplement report FireShot Capture 1 - Select SNPs_ - https___puregenomics.com_escript_selectsnps.aspx


Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.

10 thoughts on “Tools for analysis of 23andme genetic info

  • Genomapp

    Hello! We would be very grateful if you added Genomapp to the list of tools for analysis of 23andMe genetic info. It is very easy to use, the reports are friendly and clear and interpretes raw data from several providers. Thanks!!

  • Alyssa Drew

    I used a lot of those sites and they were informative, but super confusing.
    I’ve already had my genetics analyzed by an online based practitioner who specializes in this. http://www.elevatedhealthsolutions.com
    It really helped take the guessing out of what to do about my mutations, and helped me understand what they actually meant. But always looking for more info/resources out there. Thanks for the list!

  • Athletigen

    Athletigen has been updated since your article was posted. We now give individuals with 23andMe or AncestryDNA access to DNA insights and recommendations to improve their health and wellbeing.

    Athletigen’s DNA Wellness Report includes information and actionable recommendations on the topics of Aging Health, Bone and Joint Health, Metabolic Health, Muscular Fitness, Vitamins and Mineral Metabolism, and Sleep.
    Find out more at: https://athletigen.com/reports/

    The MobilityWoD report combines DNA insights with MobilityWOD, the ultimate guide to eliminating pain, preventing injury and maximizing athletic performance. This report includes a comprehensive overview of how your genes influence your training, recovery, and injury risks, with videos and recommendations from the experts at MobilityWoD.
    Find out more at: https://athletigen.com/mobility-wod/

  • Laurel Jimenez

    Thanks you so much for this list. I have done quite a bit of exploration into the potential uses of my raw dna data and, like you said, many of them are a mess of information. I would love it if you could get my access to puregenomics. I prefer platforms that provide an interpretation off the data as well as providing some clues to the actual implications of the insights. The only thing I have found thus far that provides that is http://www.xcode.in. I have not used their methylation report but i did do their nutrition report and it was extremely informational.

    -L Jimenez, USA

  • M. Richards

    I purchased the xcode (www.xcode.in) nutrition analysis of my 23andme DNA raw data. Very detailed and thorough analysis of nutritional deficiency tendencies and my body’s response to macro and micro nutrients. Gave dietary suggestions for increasing intake of various vitamins and minerals and what to avoid/consider for weight loss. Easy to understand and still provides enough information to make healthy dietary changes. Fast analysis as well! Took about 10-12 hours, well below the 48 hour estimation. Would definitely consider purchasing their other services. Richards – U.S.

    • Anne Buzzelli Post author

      I haven’t used this service, but it’s great to know about! Looks like it costs $50 for a bundle of all their reports. The question I always have with these sorts of interpretations is: “how’d they do it?” More specifically, the raw genetic data are always accurate, but the methods used to interpret them or to create recommendations based on them is fallible. It’s based on “scientific studies”. How good are these studies? How were they vetted and/or combined to come up with a standard for interpretation. Dunno. In general, the most simple interpretations (like PureGenomics.com) are most likely more usable than wide, sweeping interpretations (like how your 23andme data predict food allergies). But, I sure may be 100% wrong!